Latest Asylum Trends (2024)

Overview

1. EU+ asylum authorities received 83,000 asylum applications in March 2024, the lowest level for almost a year.

2. Syrians continued to lodge by far the most applications, 14% of all applications in March 2024, and up by 12% compared to a year earlier.

3. In March 2024, Germany received the most applications for asylum, 22% of the total, but Cyprus received by far the most applications per capita.

4. Despite the winter weather, Italy received the most applications on record.

5. The number of cases awaiting a first instance decision increased to more than 913,000 in March 2024 which is the most for more than seven years.

6. At the end of March 2024, about 4.3 million persons were benefiting from temporary protection in the EU+ after fleeing Russia’s full-scale invasion of Ukraine. Most beneficiaries were hosted by Germany and Poland, but Czechia hosted the most beneficiaries per capita.

Applications

Trends

Over the last 2 years, EU+ countries (EU Member States plus Norway and Switzerland) have seen asylum applications at levels above 100,000 applications for several months. This intensification took place in the autumns of 2022 and 2023, and was particularly acute in October 2023 when 123,000 applications were lodged, echoing the scale of refugee crisis in 2015-16. In fact, by the end of 2023, some 1.1 million applications had been lodged in the EU+ marking an 18% increase from the previous year, and the most for seven years. In addition to these new asylum applications, in March 2024 around 4.3 million persons displaced from Ukraine were receiving Temporary Protection, thereby adding a significant layer to the overall count of individuals arriving in the EU+ with protection needs. Read the EUAA’s latest Voices in Europe to learn more about forced displacement from Ukraine.

These concurrent trends - the surge in asylum applications and the influx of displaced persons from Ukraine - are exerting immense strain on the EU+ asylum and reception systems. National authorities are being pushed to their limits in their efforts to accommodate and safeguard those in need.

The winter months of 2023-24 have seen an overall decline in asylum applications, most notably in March with just 83,000 applications received in the EU+. Such a decrease is characteristic of the winter months which typically disincentivise journeys towards the EU+, especially those involving perilous sea crossings.

In March 2024, Syrians, consistently at the forefront of asylum applications in the EU+, lodged 11,200 applications, which is stable compared to the previous month and but down by a significant margin compared to the seven-year peak of October 2023. For more information, read the latest EUAA reports on Syria and its Security situation. Afghans remained the second largest nationality group despite lodging -21% fewer applications in March 2024 (7,500) compared to a year previously. Despite this overall trend, since autumn 2023 more Afghans have been seeking asylum in Greece. Read an EUAA report on the general security and humanitarian situation in Afghanistan, as well as on the targeting of certain individuals.

In the autumn of 2023, Turkish nationals sought protection in the EU+ in unprecedented numbers such that for a short time they ranked second among all citizenships seeking protection. However, this surge turned out to be short-lived because in the months that followed far fewer Turks sought protection in the EU+, falling to just 3,800 in March 2024.

Over the last few months there has been a well-documented surge of boat arrivals in the Canary Islands. Indeed, Frontex reported in Q1 2024 the most detections of illegal border-crossings on the West African route since records began. According these data, Malian and Senegalese nationals were the most commonly detected, which corresponds with a commensurate increase in the number of asylum applications being lodged by these citizenships: in March 2024, Malians lodged 2,000 applications for asylum in the EU+ which is the most on record and up by 260% compared to a year earlier, while Senegalese lodged 1,200 applications rising by 125% over the same period. In both cases, the increase almost exclusively took place in Spain.

Spain was also centre stage when it comes to a separate asylum trend which is independent of irregular migration: Venezuelans and Colombians, and to a lesser extent, Peruvians have for some time been seeking protection in Spain. These Latin American nationals, who enjoy visa-free access to the Schengen area, continued to submit significant numbers of applications in the EU+ in March 2024: 5,500 from Venezuela, 4,700 from Colombia, and 2,200 from Peru. The vast majority of these applications were lodged in Spain, accounting for 89% of Venezuelan applications and 78% of Colombian applications in March 2024, plus nearly all were first-time applications, suggesting that the applicants were newly arrived in the EU+. Importantly, in March 2024 more Peruvians lodged applications in Italy than in Spain. In response to challenges linked to visa-free travel, particularly the high numbers of unfounded asylum applications, the European Commission adopted a proposal in October 2023 to strengthen the visa suspension mechanism.

Spain has also started taking steps towards regularising half a million undocumented migrants who have been living in Spain since 2021, most of whom are from Africa and Latin America. The law will not only allow them to live and work in Spain legally but also enable them to pay taxes, contribute to social security, and access healthcare, education and other public services.

Main citizenships

To eliminate month-to-month fluctuations, the above chart offers a comprehensive overview of the asylum application trends of the top 20 nationalities in March 2024, over the last 12 months (yellow) in comparison to the preceding 12 months (blue). Syrians and Afghans lodged the most applications for asylum during both these time periods. However, Syrian applications saw a considerable increase (+30%), whereas Afghan applications declined by 20%.

Most citizenships in the chart exhibited an upward change in their application numbers, which is to some extent a statistical artefact because nationalities with declining trends are more likely to fall out of the top 20, while those with increasing trends tend to rise into the ranking. Nevertheless, it is notable that Malians and Senegalese lodged about twice as many applications in the 12 months leading up to March 2024, and Ivorians lodged applications that increased by 80%.

In contrast, among these top citizenships, in addition to Afghans, only Pakistani, Georgians and Tunisians lodged substantially fewer applications in the 12 months leading up to March 2024.

Per receiving country

In March 2024, Germany maintained its position as the foremost destination for asylum seekers in the EU+, receiving the most applications (18,000) which amounts to 22% of the total. This, despite the fact that Germany has been receiving fewer applications over the last few months, falling in fact to the lowest level since the summer 2022. Last year, it was not unusual for Germany to receive more applications than the next two receiving countries combined, but this trend was not maintained in early 2024 probably because of the combined effect of declining applications in Germany, plus Italy receiving a surge of applications, rising to 16,000 in March 2024 which is the highest on record for Italy, and constitutes 19% of the total just behind Germany.

Certain citizenships tend to lodge the vast majority of their applications in a single EU+ country. In March 2024, these included: Venezuelans and Colombians who lodged nearly 90%, and three quarters of their applications in Spain, respectively, as well as Bangladeshis, Tunisians and Egyptians all of whom lodged the vast majority of their applications in Italy.

Per capita

Evaluating which EU+ countries tend to receive the most applications for asylum is important but to some extent a simple like-for-like comparison is not appropriate because the EU+ countries vary wildly in terms of the size and capacity of their asylum and reception systems. As a rough measure of their overall capacity and a more nuanced estimation of the pressure exerted on national authorities, this chart illustrates the number of asylum applications lodged per million inhabitants (Eurostat population data).

In March 2024, Cyprus, with a small population size of around 921,000, received 1,100 asylum applications. This amounts to a rate of 1,200 applications per million population, or 1 application for every 800 inhabitants. In contrast, Germany reported many more applications for asylum (circa 18,000); however, given its larger population of 84 million, the German rate was lower at 217 applications per million inhabitants, or 1 application per 4,600 inhabitants. Italy and neighbouring Austria, while receiving very different numbers of applications per se (16,000 and 2,400, respectively) actually received very similar numbers of applications per capita: each at around or just below 270 applications per million population.

Taking the whole EU+ into consideration: its population of 463 million and 83,000 asylum applications received in March 2024, converts into 180 applications per million population, or about 1 application for every 5,400 persons.

Uniquely among EU+ countries, Hungary received just a single application for asylum in March 2024, probably because since 2020 applicants are required to submit a declaration of intent at a Hungarian embassy in a non-EU country before they can enter the country and apply for international protection. Read more in the EUAA Asylum Report 2021.

In addition to asylum applications, as of the end of March 2024, there were also 4.3 million persons benefiting from temporary protection in the EU+. This protection is based on a 2001 Directive which was triggered for the first time in response to the Russian invasion of Ukraine in 2022 with the aim of offering quick and effective assistance to people displaced to the EU+. At the end of March 2024, half of all beneficiaries of temporary protection were either in Germany (1.3 million) or Poland (1 million). For context and to allow comparisons with the inflow of asylum applications, the chart above can also be used to illustrate the number of beneficiaries of temporary protection per capita being hosted in each EU+ country. In Czechia, there were about 34,000 beneficiaries per million inhabitants, which amounts to one beneficiary for every 30 inhabitants, followed by Lithuania, Poland, and Estonia, (at approximately 25,000 – 27,000 beneficiaries per million, or 1 beneficiary for every 37 - 40 inhabitants).

Recognition Rates

First instance

Time series per citizenship

Over the past two years, the recognition rate, which reflects the percentage of asylum applications that receive decisions granting refugee status and subsidiary protection, has fluctuated around 40%, with a discernible increase in the second half of 2023. In January 2024, the EU+ recognition rose to 50% which was the highest for some time, but more recently in March 2024 the recognition rate returned to 45%. In any case, there remains much variation and trends between and within citizenships.

It is worth noting that recognition rates for most of the main citizenships differ wildly from each other but in themselves tend to remain relatively stable over time. For example, in March 2024, Georgians continued to have a recognition rate of around 4% which is in line with long term trends. However, there are exceptions to this general observation:

  • Iraqis: The recognition rate peaked in late 2023 and then again and even more so in October 2023 but has since decreased to 26% in March 2024.
  • Turks: the recognition has been in steady decline for more than the last two years from 41% in April 2022 to just 21% in March 2024.
  • Syrians: the recognition rate has been above 90% for nearly all of the last two years but there has been a trend favouring decisions granting subsidiary protection over refugee status. Indeed, refugee status fell from just 41% of all decisions in April 2022 to 24% in March 2024.
    Read EUAA Country Guidance on Syria, Syria - Country Focus and the following EUAA COI reports Security situation, Targeting of individuals, Socio-economic situation and Major human rights, security and humanitarian developments
  • Afghans: In the aftermath of the Taliban takeover in autumn 2021, the recognition rate for Afghans jumped from its usual value of just above 50% to more than 90%, before gradually returning to its former level. Adding to the complexity, there has been another increase to more than 60% since April 2023 after which time it has remained remarkably steady, standing at 69% in March 2024.
    Read EUAA Country Guidance on Afghanistan, Afghanistan - Country Focus and the following EUAA COI reports from 2022 Targeting of Individuals, Security Situation, Key socio-economic indicators and Major legislative, security-related, and humanitarian developments

Context

It should be noted that some applicants, especially those from Venezuela and to a lesser extent from Afghanistan, tend to be granted national (rather than international) forms of protection which are unregulated at the EU level and are therefore considered as negative asylum decisions in these statistics. Also, these recognition rates are based on first instance decisions issued by asylum authorities and do not account for cases decided by judiciary and other authorities at second or higher instance i.e. appeal and review. Read more in the EUAA Factsheet no 19 on recognition rates.

Across receiving countries

The aim of EUAA’s work is to foster a harmonised implementation of the Common European Asylum System across the EU so as to reach a situation where an application for international protection would receive the same decision, no matter where it was lodged. Recognition rates, the percentage of asylum applications that receive decisions granting refugee status or subsidiary protection, are sometimes cited as an indicator of the level of such harmonisation between EU+ countries.

It is important to recognise that several objective factors may lead to variations in recognition rates. The complexity of an asylum application and its examination cannot be reduced to a single measure such as the nationality of the applicant. Differences in the underlying profile of the applicant, national jurisprudence and national policies, and the application of certain legal concepts also come into play and can result in different recognition rates (Read Asylum Report - National policies on specific profiles and nationalities). Irrespective of underlying causes, the chart presented here illustrates recognition rates across the EU+ for various citizenships. In each column, individual circles of the same colour represent different issuing countries, with the size of each circle reflecting the number of decisions issued, and their placement on the vertical axis indicating the corresponding recognition rate—namely, the percentage of decisions that granted refugee status or subsidiary protection.

Between January and March 2024, the EU+ recognition rate for Afghans stood at 67% but as the chart shows, there was much variation between receiving countries (leftmost column of black circles). Most decisions were issued by Germany (the biggest circle, labelled) where the Jan.-Mar. 2024 recognition rate stood at 48%. However, it is important to note that Germany also issued many decisions to Afghans granting a national form of protection (45% of all first instance decisions, counted here as negative decisions for international protection). France also issued many decisions to Afghans with a Jan.-Mar. 2024 recognition rate of 67%, while Greece and Switzerland issued 98% and 92% positive decisions to Afghans, compared to Belgium with 35%. Read EUAA Country Guidance on Afghanistan and EUAA Country Focus on Afghanistan.

In contrast, the recognition rate for Syrians (94%) exhibited much tighter consistency among receiving countries. Among the countries issuing the most decisions for Syrians, Germany had a recognition rate of 96%, Austria 95% and the Netherlands 94%. Notwithstanding the 77% recognition rate for Syrians in Greece, this similarity in recognition rates suggests a more consistent assessment of protection needs among Syrians across these EU+ countries. For more information read the latest EUAA Country Guidance on Syria which provides an in-depth analysis of the situation in Syria, focusing on the key elements of qualification for international protection.

For more information on the above trends, read the latest EUAA Analysis on Convergence which focuses on the main factors leading to variations in recognition rates as well as on measures to achieve greater convergence.

Pending Cases

First instance

While an application is awaiting a first instance decision, it is part of the caseload of applications under examination by the asylum authorities, or so-called first instance pending cases. The number of pending cases serves as a key indicator that reflects the workload faced by national authorities and the strain on national asylum systems, including reception systems. As of the end of March 2024, some 913,000 cases were awaiting a first instance decision, which is the most for seven years.

In general, citizenships lodging the most applications tend to have the most cases awaiting decisions. For example, in March 2024, Syrians, Colombians and Turks had the largest share of first instance pending cases (112,000, 84,000 and 83,000, respectively). This situation is particularly pronounced for Colombians and Turks, for whom the number of pending cases have more than doubled since the beginning of 2023.

Context: EU+ asylum authorities strive to increase their decision making, and do so often with the operational support of the EUAA. Despite these efforts, decision making has not kept pace with the number of applications being lodged. As a consequence, we estimate that the total number of cases awaiting a decision at the end of February 2024 (including those in appeal or review) increased to around 1.2 million (Eurostat - older data included for Croatia and Romania). Within this total, we conclude that three quarters (76% or 906,000) of cases were pending at first instance, while the remaining quarter (24% or 280,000) were awaiting decisions at second or higher instances.

Research

The Survey of Asylum-related Migrants (SAM) is a multi-country project designed to collect testimonies directly from people seeking international protection across the EU+. Based on the premise that digital literacy is increasingly prevalent, the project uses online, self-administered surveys that can be completed on smartphones and offers the possibility to survey large numbers of migrants at the same time. The primary objective of SAM is to establish a permanent system of collecting standardised, reliable and comparable data on relevant topics, such as push and pull factors, travel histories and migrants’ future aspirations. Understanding these drivers both facilitates general preparedness to deal with a high number of arrivals but also to better inform policymakers.

On 11 April 2022, the EUAA launched the Survey of Arriving Migrants for Displaced People from Ukraine, with the support of the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The questionnaire was updated in February 2023 to include additional topics. Demographics of the responses since February 2023, as of 23 April 2024, are shown below but for more detailed information read the latest EUAA Employment and Education factsheet.

The survey is ongoing and accessible in Ukrainian, Russian and English at: https://tellusyourstorysurvey.eu/.

Latest Asylum Trends (1)

For more information on SAM and on other projects related to displacement from Ukraine, access the following reports:

Latest Asylum Trends (2)

Providing Temporary Protection to Displaced Persons from Ukraine

The report covers national developments in the implementation of the Temporary Protection Directive, from crisis measures to changing legislation and practices.

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Surveys of Arriving Migrants from Ukraine

This Employment and Education factsheet provides information from the updated SAM - UKR survey on reception and registration for displaced persons from Ukraine.

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Forced displacement from and within Ukraine

This report brings together the results of desk research and survey projects carried out by the EUAA, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) to detail forced displacement from and within Ukraine.

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Challenges and opportunities in rapid situational awareness of Ukrainian displacement to the European Union: Some methodological insights

This Migration Research Series paper highlights four research projects employed by the EUAA that seek to understand displacement from Ukraine to the European Union.

Latest Asylum Trends (6)

Voices Europe experiences hopes and aspirations forcibly displaced persons Ukraine Executive Summary

This report highlights the prevailing themes emerging from forced displacement, drawn from the personal testimonies of over 1,500 respondents participating in the ongoing Survey of Arriving Migrants from Ukraine.

Data Tables

By EU+ country

*Blank fields are indicative of EU+ countries not reporting on certain indicators

**Low values are rounded to the nearest 5

By country of origin

National statistics and EUAA data

Country codeEU+ countryAuthorityDisclaimer
ATAustriaFederal Ministry of the InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
BEBelgiumOffice of the Commissioner-General for Refugees and Stateless Persons (CGRS)
  1. On the national website of the CGRS, decisions issued after the initial decision was annulled by the appeal board are included as first instance decisions (as they can be appealed again). These decisions are not included as first instance decisions by EUAA.
  2. Applications and decisions made in the framework of resettlement are included on the website of the CGRS.
  3. The protection rate on the website of the CGRS is a calculation based on the number of files (cases including accompanied children) and not individual persons.
  4. The official national data on applications for international protection are also published on the website of Immigration Office (International protection | IBZ)and Eurostat (where there is a separate dataset for applications in the framework of resettlement)
  5. Data provided to the EUAA are operational data provided to EUAA within short timeframes, and there might be minor differences with the final validated data.
BGBulgariaState Agency for RefugeesNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
CHSwitzerlandState Secretariat for MigrationNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
CYCyprusAsylum Service, Ministry of InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
CZCzechiaMinistry of InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
DEGermanyFederal Office for Migration and Refugees (BAMF)National and EUAA data should be aligned for all indicators, but there may be differences for some breakdowns. Relocated applicants aren't considered in national statistics. In national statistics withdrawn applications are included in otherwise closed cases ("sonstige Verfahrenserledigungen"). Some first-instance decisions that in EUAA statistics are considered as negative decisions, in national statistics are classified as otherwise closed cases.
DKDenmark

Ministry of Immigration and Integration

The Danish Return Agency

The main causes to differences between national statistics and EUAA EPS data is the group of cases included in the statistics. For example, national statistics for asylum includes both first- and final-instance determinations and both applications, determinations in appeal, reopened cases and determinations in review.
EEEstoniaEuropean Police and Border Guard Board(in Estonian only)In general, the data should not differ, there may be cases where the data is corrected afterwards. The small difference with Eurostat data is due to the fact that Eurostat rounds the data.
ESSpainMinistry of Interior
  1. National indicators are disaggregated by sex, citizenship and age group but there are no breakdowns for first versus subsequent applications, accompanied and unaccompanied minors or to identify decisions based on Dublin closures or relocations.
  2. The national indicator on pending cases does not contain breakdowns for the duration of pending plus it only includes applications that have passed the admission phase so national totals are likely to be lower than the EPS indicator on pending cases.
  3. The national indicator on withdrawn applications does not have a breakdown for explicit versus implicit withdrawals.
  4. The national indicator on 1st instance decisions does not have a breakdown for the duration of procedure.
  5. There is no national indicator on otherwise closed cases.
  6. National indicators include other information beyond the scope of the EPS indicators, such as provinces and and type of locations where applicants lodged their applications and main recognition rates.
FIFinlandImmigration ServiceNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
FRFrance

Ministry of Interior

No major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
FRFranceFrench Office for the Protection of Refugees and Stateless PersonsNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
GRGreeceAsylum ServiceNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
HRCroatiaMinistry of InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
HUHungaryNational Directorate-General for Aliens PolicingNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
IEIrelandInternational Protection OfficeNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
ITItalyDepartmentof Civil Liberties and Immigration, Ministry of InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
LTLithuaniaMigration Department, Ministry of InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
LULuxembourgMinistry of Foreign and European AffairsNational indicators do not include children born on the Luxembourgish territory during the asylum procedure of its parents, while those children are included in the EUAA statistics. Another reason for differences can be adjustments of the data that are carried out retrospectively on the provisional data provided to EUAA.
LVLatviaOffice of Citizenship and Migration AffairsNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
MTMaltaInternational Protection AgencyNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
NLNetherlandsImmigration and Naturalisation Service (IND)No major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
NONorwayDirectorate for Immigration(in Norwegian only)

Applications: National indicators are based on the date of making the applications. The revised numbers for 2022 count persons strictly. So if one person applied for both international protection and TPD only one is counted. The pseudo-algorithm for withdrawals are disregarded compared to other statuses. If a person have multiple TPDs only, the first one is counted. The same for multiple applications for international protection.

Decisions issued: National indicators are based on the most recent decision at first instance before the case is transferred to second/final instance. For example, if a person receives a decision of implicit withdrawal and then re-appears, and receives another decision this decision will be reported in the statistics. We use the same logic to Eurostat, but the first deicion is reports to EUAA."

PLPolandOffice for Foreigners

No major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.

PTPortugalImmigration and Borders ServiceNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
RORomaniaGeneral Inspectorate for ImmigrationNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
SESwedenMigration Agency

No major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.

SISloveniaMinistry of InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
SKSlovakiaMinistry of InteriorNo major differences are expected between national and EUAA data. If discrepancies occur, they could be the result of differences in the timingof data extraction, the scope of data definitions, collection methodologies and/or retrospective revisions.
Latest Asylum Trends (2024)

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